Music Monday – The Dear Hunter: Act V

Album: Act V: Hymns with the Devil in Confessional by The Dear Hunter

Album Cover.jpg
Act V: Hymns with the Devil in Confessional

Released: September 9th, 2016

Band Info:

The Dear Hunter was formed in 2005 after Casey Crescenzo was kicked out of his previous band, The Receiving End of Sirens. What was originally a side project while he was in TREOS, The Dear Hunter became Casey’s full-time project and he recorded the first album, Act I: The Lake South, The River North, almost entirely on his own with help from friends and family. Telling the tragic life story of boy a growing up at the end of the 19th century, the band released the first three acts in 2006, 2007, and 2009 before taking a departure with their 2011 release, The Color Spectrum. This collection contained nine four-song EPs; each individual EP corresponded to a color for a total of 36 songs of various genres and moods. The band followed up with another stand-alone release, Migrant, in 2013 before returning to release the fourth and fifth acts in 2015 and 2016 respectively. The Dear Hunter has released seven full-length albums in the eleven years since their first album, continues to tour, and released a new EP last month titled All is as All Should Be.

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The Dear Hunter circa 2016.

Continue reading “Music Monday – The Dear Hunter: Act V”

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New Content Announcement

As you may have noticed, the name of the blog has changed from The Past Due Book Review to The Past Due Review; this is because, beginning this Friday, I will be posting weekly movie reviews to expand my content and discuss another form of art I love. Much like the books I am reviewing, these will not be new releases; since the films come from my own collection, I have seen many multiple times and believe this allows me to dig a little deeper in my reviews.

I hope this will lead to more discussions and sharing of our interests! Please check back on Friday for my review of In Bruges!

In Bruges.jpg

 

The image featured in this post can be found through the hyperlink below.

In Bruges

Reading Tally for 2017

Happy New Year!

Another year of wonderful books, active discussion, and new aspects to the blog! My audience grew, I created Twitter and Goodreads accounts, added more content by beginning Music Monday posts, and continue to enjoy working on this blog. It is time again to tally up the thousands of pages, and dozens of books, while looking back at what I read. I find it intriguing to reflect on what I read this year and think about what was going on while I hid my face in those pages.

You will find below the total number of novels, fiction books, nonfiction books, and graphic novels I read in 2017 in addition to the amount of pages and what I read each month; the type of book is listed before the title and the authors are in parentheses.

I look forward to what 2018 has to offer and, as always, thank you for reading!

Novels (Nov): 35

Graphic Novels (GN): 8

Non-Fiction (NF): 9

Fiction (F): 3

Total Books: 47

Overall Total: 55

Page Total17,213 Continue reading “Reading Tally for 2017”

On Writing – Review

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft by Stephen King

Published in 2000

Pages: 291

Genre: Nonfiction, memoir

“I was stunned by Mary Karr’s memoir, The Liar’s Club.”

It is difficult to find a more well-known contemporary writer than Stephen King; often seen as either the king of horror (pun slightly intended) or the harbinger of the demise of “true literature” (whatever that is), King can be polarizing, but it is difficult to argue he doesn’t know his stuff. On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft is his attempt to put to paper what he knows about the craft, what formed him as a writer, and other advice to aspiring authors in one volume that is as illuminating in its content as it is refreshing in its execution. Continue reading “On Writing – Review”

Lords and Ladies – Review

Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett

Published in 1992

Pages: 375

Genre: Fantasy, satire

“Now read on . . .”

Mystery abounds in Lords and Ladies, another entry in the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett. Much like the first line, little is given in the way of direct explanation as to the strange and esoteric beings that give their name to the book’s title. A culmination of the events from previous witches stories, Lords and Ladies sees the return of Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg, and Magrat Garlick as they face a dastardly and ancient evil. Continue reading “Lords and Ladies – Review”

Music Monday – The Dear Hunter: Act IV

Album: Act IV: Rebirth in Reprise by The Dear Hunter

Cover.jpg
Act IV: Rebirth in Reprise

Released: September 4th, 2015

Band Info:

The Dear Hunter was formed in 2005 after Casey Crescenzo was kicked out of his previous band, The Receiving End of Sirens. What was originally a side project while he was in TREOS, The Dear Hunter became Casey’s full-time project and he recorded the first album, Act I: The Lake South, The River North, almost entirely on his own with help from friends and family. Telling the tragic life story of boy a growing up at the end of the 19th century, the band released the first three acts in 2006, 2007, and 2009 before taking a departure with their 2011 release, The Color Spectrum. This collection contained nine four-song EPs; each individual EP corresponded to a color for a total of 36 songs of various genres and moods. The band followed up with another stand-alone release, Migrant, in 2013 before returning to release the fourth and fifth acts in 2015 and 2016 respectively. The Dear Hunter has released seven full-length albums in the eleven years since their first album, continues to tour, and released a new EP earlier this month titled All is as All Should Be.

Casey.jpg
On tour in support of Act IV in 2015.

Continue reading “Music Monday – The Dear Hunter: Act IV”

The Voyage of the Narwhal – Review

The Voyage of the Narwhal by Andrea Barrett

Published in 1998

Pages: 394

Genre: Historical fiction, maritime fiction

“He was standing on the wharf, peering down at the Delaware River while the sun beat on his shoulders.”

Befitting a story that has water and maritime exploration at its heart, the first lines of The Voyage of the Narwhal by Andrea Barrett place the reader along the Delaware River. We then set sail with the crew of the Narwhal toward glory and fame in the endeavor to recover a lost explorer. Unfortunately, despite the book’s premise and promise of a tale of adventure, what follows is lackluster execution marred by missed opportunities for genuine tension. Continue reading “The Voyage of the Narwhal – Review”